#BookReview: The Poppy Field by Deborah Carr

Genre
Historical Romance

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DESCRIPTION: 
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.

Young nurse, Gemma, is struggling with the traumas she has witnessed through her job in the NHS. Needing to escape from it all, Gemma agrees to help renovate a rundown farmhouse in Doullens, France, a town near the Somme. There, in a boarded-up cupboard, wrapped in old newspapers, is a tin that reveals the secret letters and heartache of Alice Le Breton, a young volunteer nurse who worked in a casualty clearing station near the front line.

Set in the present day and during the horrifying years of the war, both woman discover deep down the strength and courage to carry on in even the most difficult of times. Through Alice’s words and her unfailing love for her sweetheart at the front, Gemma learns to truly live again.

This is a beautifully written epic historical novel that will take your breath away.


REVIEW: 
Deborah Carr’s The Poppy Field is a bittersweet romance about secrets, survivor’s guilt, and the fortitude required to move forward after unimaginable loss.

A dual period piece, the novel follows a modern-day trauma nurse who unwittingly uncovers the story of a volunteer who worked at a casualty clearing station during the Somme offensive. The stories have interesting symmetry, but I felt the historic half of the narrative the stronger of the two.

Gemma and Alice have interesting backstories, but I’d have liked to see more depth in both Tom and Ed. That said, two of the supporting characters, Odette and Jack, struck me as particularly compelling and I liked how their actions spoke to their individual characters.

All in all, I found The Poppy Field light and predictable but satisfying in its own way and could easily recommend it alongside Diney Costeloe’s The Lost Soldier.

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
Obtained from: Netgalley
Read: October 4, 2018

Alice wondered how many more patients they could take, or how many soldiers tther were still left to injure in the battles being fought in various areas across the Western Front...

RECOMMENDATIONS: RELATED READING




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